Requirement acquirement

Posted on May 19, 2010. Filed under: All, forensic | Tags: , , , , , , , , |

In a few recent posts, I’ve talked about the “fitness for purpose” challenge and the fact that it seems to be causing confusion or consternation amongst those who haven’t dismissed it as irrelevant. Partly, I think, this is because of misunderstanding about what the regulatory environment really means. The Forensic Science Regulator’s primary role is to produce Quality Standards for Forensic Science, not to define procedures. In that context, “fitness for purpose” is a test of whether or not something passes tests to show that it is fit for whatever purpose the forensic science provider wishes to use it for. Nothing more. There is no complex or secret agenda here. It’s simply a question of demonstrating that anything being used (method, process or tool) meets the requirements defined by the person using it, or by their customers.

Having recently written a “complementary evidence” report, in which I gave an independent view of some deviation from accepted procedures, I am now convinced that the approach we came up with at the meeting in December (see http://www.n-gate.net/ under “Regulation”) is right – we need to consider whether or not we can produce a set of industry-wide requirements which can be used as a starting point or menu by each provider. If we can get them agreed by the industry, we have the potential to standardise testing of methods, processes and tools as well as identifying gaps in current practice, and laying the groundwork for the future.

“Where to begin?” has been the stumbling block for the last couple of months, but now I have an idea. Watch this space and http://www.n-gate.net/ for progress.

Unrelated : I’ve been playing with a product called ZumoDrive on my Mac, Palm Pre (thankyou HP – WebOS has a future it seems!) and Linux server for a few weeks now. At the basic level it’s a free 2Gb cloud filespace which can link folders across multiple machines so they are always in sync as well as appearing as a targetable drive on all machines. It hasn’t fallen over yet and is providing me with an online backup for some important, but not confidential, files as well as taking over as a music storage service. Highly recommended. Upon installation, you get 1Gb free, but if you complete the online “dojo” training, you get another 1Gb. ( http://www.zumodrive.com/ ). Don’t rely on it as your only backup – but if you need to have access to different types of files in multiple locations, try it out – it even has version tracking and a web interface. (Apparently, it works on some lesser smartphones too ;P )

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    About

    This is the weblog of Angus M. Marshall, forensic scientist, author of Digital Forensics : digital evidence in criminal investigations and MD at n-gate ltd.

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