Archive for March, 2010

What’s in a name ?

Posted on March 29, 2010. Filed under: All, forensic | Tags: , , , , |

I’M ON THE TRAIN!

on my way back from yet another meeting. Funny how I used to hate them when I was a salaried employee, but find them quite interesting since there’s no way they can turn into extra work, unless I want them to, now.

The topic and participants aren’t really relevant to this entry, other than to note that it was a meeting about standards (of a sort) in digital forensics and that the participants were drawn from quite a wide community.

What I found really interesting about it was the way that the meeting seemed to start with the premise that digital forensics is a sub-discipling of information security. That’s something I’ve heard time and time again over the years and have even struggled with when it comes to getting papers published. The info. sec. community quite rightly understand that there is a “forensic” element required in their work – especially when things go wrong or when some sort of attack is attempted, but I would argue that digital forensics goes beyond the realms of info. sec. (and that’s why I always got bad referees’ reports on papers).

It’s not just about law enforcement either, which is the other view I’ve heard expressed on occasion.

No, to me, digital forensics is about the investigation of activity using data found on digital devices. The activity itself may not be a crime, may not constitute misuse, but may have some value in another context. Yes we ought to understand that, strictly speaking, “forensic” means it relates to courts & the law, but common use of the word now seems to mean “investigative science” (isn’t that redundant – isn’t all good science investigative anyway ? ) and digital forensics is a tool which can be deployed in a multitude of contexts. So, my stance is that it overlaps law enforcement and information security as a discipline in its own right, with features from both of those areas and more.

In fact – on Wednesday this week, snow permitting, I’ll be talking about yet another use – digital forensics in fire investigation – in Aberdeen.

Leave your thoughts and comments and I might award a buttery for the best one 😉

Of course, maybe the real problem is that we haven’t stopped to define digital forensics properly yet…

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    About

    This is the weblog of Angus M. Marshall, forensic scientist, author of Digital Forensics : digital evidence in criminal investigations and MD at n-gate ltd.

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